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Occupational Therapy

A Few Facts About the OT Profession

  • Employment is projected to increase much faster than the average, as rapid growth in the number of middle-aged and elderly individuals increases the demand for therapeutic services.
  • Beginning in 2007, a master’s degree or higher in occupational therapy will be the minimum educational requirement.
  • Occupational therapists are increasingly taking on supervisory roles, allowing assistants and aides to work more closely with clients under the guidance of a therapist, in an effort to reduce the cost of therapy.
  • More than a quarter of occupational therapists work part time.

Occupational therapists (OTs) help people improve their ability to perform tasks in their daily living and working environments. They work with individuals who have conditions that are mentally, physically, developmentally, or emotionally disabling. They also help them to develop, recover, or maintain daily living and work skills. Occupational therapists help clients not only to improve their basic motor functions and reasoning abilities, but also to compensate for permanent loss of function. Their goal is to help clients have independent, productive, and satisfying lives.

This information comes directly from the Occupational Outlook Handbook published by the Dept. of Labor. For additionl information on the OT profession, training, employment, job outlook, and salaries go to www.bls.gov/oco. Use the A to Z menu and click on the link for Occupational Therapist.